Top 10 Scuba Diving Destinations in Malaysia

Malaysia is home to a plethora of world-class diving sites ideal for divers of all levels of expertise. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned diver, once Malaysia has you under its spell, you’ll be enthralled dive after dive. The following are Malaysia’s top 10 scuba diving destinations.

1. Sipadan Island

Sipadan, one of the country’s only oceanic islands, is the epitome of marine biodiversity and one of Malaysia’s most popular diving destinations. Sipadan Island, in addition to being a dependable scuba dive destination, increases the diving experience due to the variety of water species that breathe here.

2. Mabul Island

Mabul Island is located near to Sipadan and is also well-known for diving in Malaysia. It is home to microscopic marine species such as frogfish, cuttlefish, blue-ringed octopus, mimic octopus, bobtail squids, and spike-fin goby. Mabul has a wide range of housing alternatives for its visitors, making it both accessible and popular.

3. Lankayan Island

Lankayan Island is one of Malaysia’s most beautiful diving destinations. Lankayan attracts visitors from all over the world due to its spectacular views, submarine wreck, and whale sharks. In addition to whales, it includes enormous clams, claw anemonefishes, decorator and spider crabs, coral shrimps, nudibranchs, prawn gobies, seahorses, ghost pipefish, flying gurnards, parrotfishes, rays, and guitarfish.

4. Layang-Layang Island

Layang-Layang is a little island with shallow waters. Its specialty is the exquisite preservation of undersea life. There is only one large resort on the island, and it is surrounded by a swarm of colourful birds. Hammerhead sharks, pygmy seahorses, jack fish, barracuda, and manta rays are among the larger marine animals found in Layang-Layang.

5. Redang Island

Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redang_Island

Redang is one of the country’s largest and most affluent islands. Redang is one of Malaysia’s most popular diving destinations, thanks to its brilliant blue waters and white sandy beaches. The main reason tourists flock to Redang is that it has a variety of hotel alternatives and is less expensive than neighbouring islands.

6. Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park

Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park is a group of five islands named after Malaysia’s first prime minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman. The park features 25 diving spots and several facilities for guests. It is popular with first-time divers and is fairly crowded on weekends. As a result, it is recommended that you schedule your dive here. There are numerous corals, large fish, and turtles at the site.

7. Tenggol Island

Tenggol Island has some of the most breathtaking views in the country. However, diving is only safe for experienced divers because the current here is rather strong. Tenggol features over 20 dive sites, some of which have well-defined wrecks. Whale sharks have also been observed here by a few lucky visitors.

8. Lang Tengah Island

Lang Tengah is a lesser-known and smaller island in comparison to the other Malaysian islands. Because it is less popular with tourists, the flora and fauna are carefully preserved. There are a few resorts on the island, as well as some of Malaysia’s most beautiful diving spots. Coral reefs, several varieties of fish, and turtles abound at the site.

9. Tioman Island

Tioman is a big island that offers a variety of activities such as diving, snorkelling, kayaking, and so on. Without a doubt, scuba diving, particularly wreck diving, is the most popular. The facility offers one of the most diverse collections of marine life, including corals, cuttlefish, angelfish, barracuda and turtles, moorish idols, and trevally.

10. Perhentian Island

Perhentian Island has been voted Malaysia’s top diving location. It is also the most affordable in terms of lodging and diving instruction. Perhentian is a diver’s paradise, especially for beginners. Turtle conservation projects are carried out here. Blue-spotted stingrays, boxfish, angelfish, and parrotfish, as well as staghorn gardens, lettuce corals, and table corals, call it home.

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